Supporting a Wind Power Project in the Caribbean

We have now offset another 50,000 ton CO2eq in a Gold Standard certified project! Thank you for taking part in this!

The Caribbean is a region heavily dependent on fossil fuels, while at the same time it’s a particularly promising place for renewable energies with abundant sun and wind conditions. Demand is comparatively low because the islands have small populations, which means that small scale energy solutions have the capacity to cover a large share of the energy needs.

Vader Piet N.V. Wind Park

This is our project

Aruba is one of the islands moving towards reduced dependency on fossil fuels and increased share of renewables. The first initiative for wind energy production on the island is the Wind Park Vader Piet N.V, which we are supporting through the purchase of carbon credits!

This wind park consists of 10 wind turbines that are located on an uninhabited part of the island. With a production capacity of 3 MW each, these turbines supply 12-14% of the total energy needed on the island! Since all energy consumed before the implementation of this project came from fossil fuel, the carbon intensity of the electricity available on the island was very high. Fortunately, Wind Park Vader Piet N.V has instigated a change for the better.

Plans for the future

The national energy producer, WEB Aruba, made a commitment which increased the share of renewables to 18% in 2018, and reduced the fossil fuel consumption by 40%. Moving forward, the goal is to reduce the fossil fuel consumption by a total of 67% and to increase renewables to a total of 40% by 2022. After the first wind park was built, a first solar park has also been installed and another wind park is in the development phase.

Why not 100% renewable today?

A challenge that Aruba and other small island nations is facing when transitioning to renewables is the grid stability. Wind and solar are intermittent energies, which means that energy is produced during certain times of the day when it’s sunny or windy. However, this doesn’t always correspond with the time that the energy is needed. In some cases, energy use in industries can be rescheduled to match peak energy availability hours, but for household electricity this is much harder.

To manage this, one option is to invest in energy storage such as batteries, and another one is to use a base load energy that can be adjusted to produce energy when demand is high and renewable production is low. In some cases, this can be done with geothermal energy (like our project Dora II in Turkey), more common is hydro power, nuclear energy or fossil fuels. WEB Aruba is working with a commitment to resolve this, taking into consideration that the development has to happen over time in order to maintain grid stability as infrastructure needs to keep up. It is also crucial to keep energy prices affordable to the local population. In Europe and other places, this challenge is cushioned by our interconnected grids, where energy surplus can be sent to a neighboring country, and energy can be purchased from where the production is the greenest in the moment.

Read more about the project in the Gold Standard Registry

Vader Piet N.V. Wind Park is located far away from the residents of the island

A big thanks to all of you for enabling this development!

Do you want to contribute to this, and other similar projects? Calculate your carbon footprint and start your offsetting today!

Supporting a Solar Energy Project in India

We have now offset another 25,000 ton CO2eq in a Gold Standard certified project! Thank you all GoClimate members for taking part in this!

The climate benefits of this 70 MW Bhadla Solar Power Plant

We decided it was time for another solar energy project, in Rajasthan, the northwestern part of India. The main purpose of this project is to produce clean electricity through photovoltaic (PV) solar panels. This is a large scale solar project. It has an installed capacity of 70 MW, generating 122,108 MWh per year.

Large scale solar PV plant in Rajasthan, India

To give you an idea of how much electricity that is – an average American home uses about 7,200 kWh per year. This project could support 16,960 American homes yearly. But as an average Indian household uses only about 1000 kWh, this equals the annual electricity consumption of 122,108 homes! Add to that that there are almost twice as many people per household in India compared to the US (2,6 compared to 4,9). This amount of electricity supplies a population of 44,096 Americans or 598,329 Indians!

Rows and rows of solar cells out in the desert

In supplying all of this clean energy, the people in this region don’t have to use fossil fuels such as coal or oil to generate electricity anymore. This is still very common in India. Coal is still the most used source of energy. About 9 percent of the energy comes from renewable sources. The share has grown exponentially, from 3,72 percent in 2014-2015. We are so excited to be a part of this positive trend! Thanks to these large investments, we help push down the prices of this clean technology, making it more affordable all over the world.

The benefits for the local community

Improved school attendance

This project has made significant contributions to strengthen the local community on their way to meet the sustainable development goals. In summer, when temperatures rise to 40 degrees Celsius in the area, up to fifty percent of students would not attend school. This is due to the unreliable electricity supply not guaranteeing adequate indoor temperatures. Now, the school attendance is almost 100 percent in summer. Moreover, the company running the project has supported the construction of improved toilets, a classroom, and a digital corner with computers and a projector. The local youth thus have better learning opportunities, and adults have also been supported with literacy sessions.

Supporting women’s developement

A Self-Help Group for women has been founded, where the women learn new skills, primarily related to tailoring and sewing. The women are also given literacy training, which they describe as a big change in their lives.

Self-Help Group for women, where they learn new skills

New clean water facilities

The company in charge of the project has also installed a water ATM in the village, and supplied the local police station with access to clean drinking water. Again, as the temperatures get very high in the summer, this makes a big difference to the locals.

These are only a few examples of the many small initiatives through which the project participant support the local community.

Locals using the newly inaugurated drinking water facilities

The importance of local participation

When a project of this scale comes into a small village, it is fundamental that they develop a good relationship with the local people. There has to be mutual trust and respect for the project to run smoothly, which entails that the project listens to the needs of the locals. That is how they can ensure that they provide what the locals actually want for themselves, and makes sure they feel ownership over their development. Therefore, we are so happy to support projects like this, because it recognizes and actively contributes to multiple aspects of sustainable growth.

Read more about the project in the Gold Standard Registry or in the CDM Registry

Want to contribute to this, and other similar projects? Calculate your carbon footprint and transition to a climate neutral life today!

Belen Wind Power Plant

We have now offset another 50,000 ton CO2eq in a Gold Standard certified project! Thank you for taking part in this!

Renewable energy has to make up a larger share of the market globally, which is why we are now financing the Belen Wind Project in Turkey. The major purpose of the project activity is providing electricity from renewable sources to the rapidly growing Turkish electricity market.

The project is expected to generate about 135,000 MWh of electricity per year and prevent approximately 74,444 tonnes of CO2 emissions annually compared to the baseline scenario. Even though wind is increasing in Turkey, there is a heavy reliance on fossil fuels such as oil and coal, and the share of natural gas has grown to reach the same proportion as the other sources. We want to finance this kind of projects to show that there is support for sustainable energy, and spread awareness of the feasibility of better alternatives.

This project consists of an installation of 16 wind turbines, each having a capacity of 3000 kW, in Belen, on the Southeast Mediterranean coast of Turkey. The wind farm provides a total capacity of 48MW and is connected to the national grid. The project employs state of the art technology and installed high capacity 3MW turbines instead of 1.5MW turbines that used to be installed in the earlier days of wind energy developments in Turkey. These new turbines enable better use of the wind potential with a reduced project footprint area, minimising the impact on the natural environment.

It is worth mentioning that if not prepared and designed properly, wind energy can have negative environmental impacts. This is why it is important to do a so-called Environmental Impact Assessment. As we purchase credits from projects certified by Gold Standard, there has been a rigorous control of the risks as all projects have to comply with the “Safeguarding Principles and Requirements” . This covers human rights, gender issues, corruption, water and land use, and other potential impacts. Another important part of the project preparation is the stakeholder consultation, which is also documented in Project Design Document. 

For this project in particular, it is described in the Project Design Document that ”…some trees will be cut in order to enlarge the road to the site and to clear the surroundings of the turbines. However; it was assured that new plantation will be done in return by local Forestry Management”. Other issues addressed in the preparation phase was the concern for bird migration in the area, and potential impact from waste and water usage during the construction phase. Having this information available is mandatory, and is how we know we can trust the project. It allows for accountability, so that we can hold the project developer responsible for the impacts and mitigation measures. 

More information about this project in the Gold Standard registry (including verification and monitoring reports) HERE

See our retired credits HERE, HERE and HERE

Sidrap Wind Energy Project

We have now offset another 25,000 ton CO2eq in a Gold Standard certified project! Thank you for making this happen!

This time, your contributions are funding the first ever wind farm in Indonesia. With 30 wind turbines reaching a total capacity of 75 MW, it is also the largest wind farm in all of South East Asia. Through this project, we are supporting Indonesia and its island Sulawesi to see beyond fossil fuels and stimulate both the development of the electricity grids and the national politics in a climate-positive direction.

Indonesia is a country that depends heavily on fossil fuels for its energy production. That in itself is not unique, but given its large population of 264 million, it is remarkable that there has been no wind power at all – until now. The potential for renewable energies in Indonesia is massive, estimated to 14 times their current demand. However, the country has very cheap coal, which sells domestically for less than the global market price, so the economic incentive for renewable energy is weak. In cases like these, the possibility to finance the development with sales of CO2-credits can be one solution to implement green energy projects.

This project has several benefits – Indonesians will now be able to see the positive impact of the wind power for themselves and we are proving the feasibility of this energy source in a local context. The project will also stimulate capacity development, as locals are recruited for the construction and operation of the facility. This breaking of new ground will facilitate for future wind energy projects. Moreover, it puts pressure on the development of the grids to become more flexible and interconnected, so that the electricity can be distributed in an efficient way.

The capital of Indonesia had a major power blackout earlier this year, highlighting the need for grid flexibility and a robust energy system. The politicians in Indonesia have also made a point to set the national target for renewable energy to 23% for 2025, which is twice as much renewables as in 2018 and therefore a significant contribution to the common goal of the Paris Agreement. Impressive! We hope that this is the first of many wind power plants in Indonesia, and are happy to see that there is already another one being built on the same island.

More information about this project in the Gold Standard registry (including verification and monitoring reports) HERE

See our retired credits HERE and HERE

Svilosa Biomass Project

We have now offset another 50,000 ton CO2eq in a Gold Standard certified project! Thank you for taking part in this!Our most recent offsetting is a biomass project connected to the Svilosa pulp mill in Bulgaria, where the operations have been improved in order to use their waste for biofuels. Through this project, the biomass residues from the pulp production (mainly bark) are combusted in a specially designed biomass boiler to generate thermal energy in the form of water steam. This heat is then used directly in the production of the pulp, and thus the mill avoids buying energy from a nearby coal power plant, which they did before. The capacity of the biomass boiler is 19.732 MW (thermal).This is an interesting project to finance because it is very clear exactly how much coal power we are avoiding, and it gives us maximum assurance that the amount CO2 avoided is accurate. The paper industry is very energy-intensive, so we can achieve significant impact by helping them transition to a more climate-smart production. Moreover, given the current state of consumption, many people concerned with the environment want to reduce the use of plastic. Paper is seen as a better alternative, which is why we think it is a particularly suitable industry to finance the transition of. Finally, this development is today classified as the best available technology, which means that we are helping this pulp become as modern and efficient as possible.The pulp plant use FSC-labeled wood in its production, which indicates that they take a broader environmental responsibility, and they have also continued to invest in energy-efficient production after this effort. Another exciting aspect is that paper production is one of the industries where there is potential for developing so-called CCS technology, Carbon Capture and Storage, so that the plants can avoid even more emissions from the production.When the project started, it was seen as an investment that would not have happened without this support from climate credits. This is what we denominate additionality when climate projects are being developed. Much has happened both in Bulgaria and globally since then with different national commitments and the development of international climate policy. We see this project as part of this transition process and something that we want to encourage. This factory is the only one of its kind in the region and it is valuable that they maintain a high standard as that sends the right signals both to neighbouring countries and to the EU. A sustainable industry also creates jobs and contributes positively to the country’s economy.

More information about this project in the Gold Standard registry (including verification and monitoring reports) HEREOur retired credits: https://registry.goldstandard.org/credit-blocks/details/58599 https://registry.goldstandard.org/credit-blocks/details/58600 https://registry.goldstandard.org/credit-blocks/details/58601

Santa Marta Landfill Gas Recovery

Landfill Gas to Energy project in Chile

Gold Standard

We have now offset another 50,000 ton CO2eq in a Gold Standard certified project!

The project Santa Marta Landfill Gas Capture for Electricity Generation Project is a landfill gas to energy project. The projects involves the collection and utilization of landfill gas for generation of electricity.

Located in one of the most important landfills in the Santiago region of Chile, the project reduces greenhouse gas emissions by capturing, flaring and generating electricity from the methane gas (LFG) produced at the landfill. Methane is a powerful green house gas that is 28-36 more potent than CO2 over a 100 year lifespan.

The Santa Marta landfill spans over 700 acres and receives approximately 1.3 million metric tons of waste every year. The resulting LFG produces 28 MW of renewable energy into the regional grid.

This Gold Standard-certified project includes a plan to continuously support local communities through a nursery and day care in Lonquén, as well as investments in school infrastructure. This simultaneously creates new job opportunities for women staffing these facilities, and allows women working on the Santa Marta Landfill Gas Recovery Project to use the nursery while they are at work.

More information about this project in the Gold Standard registry (including verification and monitoring reports):
https://registry.goldstandard.org/projects/details/689

Our retired credits:
https://registry.goldstandard.org/credit-blocks/details/47973

More pictures:







Methane Digesters in Guizhou Province

Gold Standard

We have now offset another 30,000 ton CO2eq in a Gold Standard certified project!

The project has distributed and installed 18,870 biogas digesters for local households in China. In the digesters, pig manure is treated anaerobically in order to recover biogas. This biogas is then used as thermal energy to replace the coal for cooking and water heating.

The project leads to the reduction of coal consumption and consequently the reduction of carbon dioxide emission. Meanwhile, the recovery and utilization of biogas from biogas digester will reduce Methane emission that would otherwise have been emitted to the atmosphere. Methane is a powerful green house gas that is 28-36 more potent than CO2 over a 100 year lifespan.

The project covers 27 townships at Hezhang County, Guizhou Province of China. 

More information about this project in the Gold Standard registry (including verification and monitoring reports): https://registry.goldstandard.org/projects/details/449

Invoice: Invoice EMS-1441

Retired credits:
https://registry.goldstandard.org/credit-blocks/details/42264
https://registry.goldstandard.org/credit-blocks/details/42265
https://registry.goldstandard.org/credit-blocks/details/42266













 

Supporting Efficient Cookstoves in Rwanda

Gold Standard

We have now offset another 20,000 ton CO2eq in a Gold Standard certified project!

By distributing cookstove technology to communities in Rwanda, this project benefits the environment by significantly reducing CO2 intense fuel consumption. Health conditions inside homes are improved due to the presence of less indoor smoke, and families can spend less time collecting wood fuel and more time with their families.

Biomass, principally firewood and charcoal, holds huge importance in Rwanda, accounting for a significant proportion of energy consumption. Biomass is often the predominant source of energy for cooking and water boiling, especially in rural areas. Cooking is generally carried out on thermally inefficient traditional devices and produces large amounts of smoke and indoor air pollution.

The replacement fuel-efficient stove will lead to a significant reduction in the annual usage of biomass for users. The improved stove has been designed to balance efficiency, safety, cost, stability and strength with a focus on using locally available materials.

By reducing the consumption of non-renewable wood and providing cookstoves with fuel savings, this project reduces the amount of greenhouse gas emissions into the atmosphere. A decrease of deforestation has a positive impact on biodiversity. Households save money by having less fuel requirements for cooking the same amount of food and health is improved through the reduction of indoor air pollutants from cleaner cookstoves. The project also generates employment and income for people via the distribution and maintenance of the stoves, as well as training and employing community education staff.

More information about this project in the Gold Standard registry (including verification and monitoring reports): https://registry.goldstandard.org/projects/details/155

Invoice: invoice Go Climate Neutral

Retired credits:
https://registry.goldstandard.org/credit-blocks/details/39225
https://registry.goldstandard.org/credit-blocks/details/39226
https://registry.goldstandard.org/credit-blocks/details/39227

Second Investment in Godawari Green Energy Solar

Gold Standard

We have now offset another 25,000 ton CO2eq in a CDM and Gold Standard certified project!

Located in northern India, this large-scale, 50 MW-capacity solar thermal power project generates almost 119,000 MWh for India’s Combined Regional Grid, displacing electricity sourced from the burning of fossil fuels to reduce emissions and contribute to regional sustainable development.

India is the world’s second largest country by population, beaten only by China – and it is rapidly catching up. As its developing economy strengthens further and rapid population growth continues, India’s energy needs are rising. While the share of renewables in India’s energy mix is growing, coal still accounts for over half of its electricity production.

Located in Jaisalmer District in North India’s Rajasthan State, this large-scale solar thermal power project helps satiate India’s growing energy demands. The 50 MW-capacity solar thermal plant uses parabolic trough technology to generate almost 119,000 MWh of clean energy for the Combined Regional Grid annually, further diversifying India’s electricity mix away from fossil fuels.

On top of supplanting fossil fuels with clean electricity to reduce emissions, the project proponent commits 2% of Carbon Emission Reduction (CER) sales to community welfare and sustainable development projects. The social benefits of this include local employment opportunities that alleviate regional poverty, as well as better roads and improved basic infrastructure. The project also contributes to the transfer of environmentally sound, state-of-the-art thermal solar power generation technology in India, and encourages further technology development.

You can read more about last time we invested in this project here.

More information about this project in the Gold Standard registry (including verification and monitoring reports): https://registry.goldstandard.org/projects/details/1705

More information on the UN-site here: https://cdm.unfccc.int/Projects/DB/KBS_Cert1348206450.84/view

Certificate: Certificate 25000 Godwari

See more pictures of the project here: https://www.gettyimages.co.uk/search/2/image?events=170700953&family=editorial&sort=best#

Nanyang Danjiang River Solar Cooker Project

We have for the second time invested in the Gold Standard-certified CDM-project Nanyang Danjiang River Solar Cooker Project and contributed to preventing 15 000 ton of CO2 from reaching the atmosphere. Thank you so much everyone for contributing to a cleaner and greener future!

The Nanyang Solar Project improves the indoor hygiene and living conditions of 48,000 rural households in one of the poorest regions in China. By replacing traditional coal-fired cooking stoves with clean solar cookers – CO2-emissions are reduced and the quality of life of 48,000 rural household are improved.

In the rural area of Xichuan County, Henan Province it is estimated that 76.4% of local households use coal-fired stoves as the main energy source for their daily lives. Not only do these coal stoves create harmful carbon emissions, but the large amount of wood and coal fuel they require is in dwindling supply.

The Nanyang Danjiang Solar Cooker Project enables these rural households to substitute traditional coal stoves for a solar energy alternative. 48,000 of these stoves have been distributed to seven towns in the Xichuan County, Henan Province. They are 50% more efficient than traditional coal stoves and, with an energy capacity of 876.5 W per unit, displace the CO2 that would have been generated by the fossil fuel consumption of coal fires.

With access to solar cooker methods, local residents now have a cleaner, practical and more efficient way to meet the energy demand of their daily cooking. By switching to solar power, health issues related to the excess soot and indoor smoke-pollution of coal fires have been abated. The solar cookers are distributed and maintained by the project for free, and because they no longer have to purchase coal fuel, villagers can use the money saved to buy things that improve their standard of living.

More information on the UN-site: https://cdm.unfccc.int/Projects/DB/TUEV-RHEIN1335494252.18/view

More information on the Gold Standard Registry: https://registry.goldstandard.org/projects/details/1611

Certificate of transaction: accountStatement

Invoice: invoice nanyang

Sustainable Development Goals this project contributes to:

1,728,061 people benefit from the implementation of this project. This frees up household incomes for the improvement of living standards.


30 jobs are expected to be created by the project implementation, directly contributing to the economic growth of the region.



48,000 solar cookers are distributed, facilitating
sustainable cooking practices
across 7 rural communities.



105 138 tonnes CO2eq removed from the atmosphere
yearly, directly contributing to climate change mitigation.